Ringing for “Ogni Santi”

by Faithful Friar

Last week at the feast of All Saints part of our ringing band at the Church of the Transfiguation rang some plain courses of Stedman doubles for the very first time to help celebrate the day with special ringing. Plain courses are the basic pattern of a method without having any calls from a conductor to swap individual bells onto different tracks in order to extend it. The Stedman pattern (“method” – technically a “principle”) is one of the most ancient compositions in English change-ringing and is also considered among the most pretty or tuneful. Our rendition may not quite have reached that level, but it’s a start (literally)!
Ringing for All Saints put me in mind of being stationed at our community’s mission house in Barga, Italy last year (Villa Via Sacra, whose purpose is to house and host outreaches in sacred art and spirituality). All Saints — Ogni Santi — is a huge feast in Italy where families unite to honor their dear departed with the most elaborate floral displays in all their cemeteries. And as one might expect the campanelli (bell ringers) in Italy’s churches have developed special and elaborate ringing traditions for it as well.
I was privileged to do some simple ringing with members of the Barga band in the belfry of its main church (Duomo) near the villa. It is a venerable tradition over there, and every church small or great has its gruppo campanile. Attached is a video showing my 2 Italian ringing teachers Christian and Franco performing their style of All Saints ringing in the Duomo campanile. With all of life’s uncertainties it’s good to find oneself in a stream of tradition. And hopefully the ringing itself can encourage others!

This entry was posted in Bell Ringing, Bells, Feast Days and Celebrations, Saints by Faithful Friar. Bookmark the permalink.


About Faithful Friar

I am a 20+ year member of the Community of Jesus Brotherhood, so I live in the Friary with the other vowed brothers along with any novices or combination of guest/ resident men – young or old – who may be with us at any given time. Our vows are the same as any simple or solemnly professed Community member, with the addition of consecrated celibacy and poverty. I moved here shortly out of high school to study music for a summer. At the end of that summer I chose to stay here as a CJ member. Shortly thereafter I knew another change was needed, and asked to be accepted into the brotherhood first as a postulant, later as a novice. My life in the Brotherhood involves a variety of occupations, but they are centered on the continual service of prayer and praise in our church and on the outreach ministries springing from that service. This means manual labor as well as ongoing study and training: theological, musical, technical/ scientific, artistic, historical, philosophical, etc. Sometimes this involves teaching others, so that is part of our life too. It’s a life of poverty and yet full of hidden riches.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *